Category: Winter 2018

KELLEIGH STEWART: HAWAI‘I ISLAND

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF KELLEIGH STEWART
INTERVIEW BY LINDSEY KESEL

Kelleigh Stewart was raised in the farming community of Draper, Utah. Her father was a farrier/blacksmith (aka cowboy) and her mom, an Avon lady. She spent a decade in Portland before buying a dilapidated farm in Puna, Hawai‘i off of Craigslist. Today, the restored farm serves as a home base where she and her husband, along with their staff, farm, mill, and roast beans to provide specialty-grade coffees for customers of the two wholesale companies she co-owns, Big Island Coffee Roasters and Paradise Roasters.

“For me, blue collar work is a deeply honest and real form of work,” says Stewart. “Perhaps it can be reduced to a particular love language, or being a bit obsessive to aim for the highest quality work in what you do, but I strongly feel that the passion you put into the product becomes the respect and appreciation you have for the people you’re providing it to.”

What is your tattoo?

On the top of her back, she has a blackberry bush and sycamore tree that are transitioning between their spring and autumn stages.

When did you get it?

She got inked in 2006 by famed Portland artist James Kern.

What was the inspiration?

This tattoo marks a particularly blissful time in Stewart’s life when she spent much of her days harvesting Oregon’s prolific berries, wild and cultivated mushrooms, figs, and nuts, and making yogurts and kefirs. Her husband farmed organic vegetables at a local CSA, and she would often dream up creative meals for the week with whatever random assortments he came home with. “I had quit my higher- paying, career-line position at the American Red Cross’ national blood laboratory to try something different, and I’m so glad I did,” she says. “It afforded me the time to delve into what I’m now passionate about: serving people and high-end local products.”

COFFEE BLOSSOM & BLACKBERRY SPRITZER

In our 2015 Winter “Skin” issue, edible Hawaiian Islands ran a story called “Culinary Ink,” featuring five incredible local personalities with food-related tattoos. It became one of our most popular issues to date, but we regretted the fact that we didn’t get a chance to highlight any inked women (though not for lack of trying!). This is the long overdue follow-up, where we showcase ladies from four islands who love food so much they’ve creatively stamped themselves with captivating foodie artwork.

DABNEY GOUGH: O‘AHU


PHOTOGRAPHED BY MIEKO HORIKOSHI
INTERVIEW BY LINDSEY KESEL

Dabney Gough spent her childhood on a Virginia farm that has been in her family for six generations and marks the spot where she first fell in love with food. “I was spoiled early on by the bounty of locally grown produce from our garden and nearby,” she says. “Perfectly ripe, sun-warmed tomatoes, amazingly sweet Halifax cantaloupes, and mulberries right off the tree.”

In San Francisco, she worked for Bi-Rite Market in the Mission District and co-authored two cookbooks. These days she rocks the role of marketing manager for Hawaiian Ola, a local company that uses responsibly grown ingredients to make healthy beverage products. “Food is so much more than fuel,” says Gough. “The choices we make about food tell us who we are, and what we care about.”

What is your tattoo?

Gough designed her tattoo: a whisk and a chef’s knife crossed in an “X” shape, like a coat of arms. “I wanted something iconic and simple that spoke to the tools of my new trade,” she says. “There’s a kind of yinyang aspect to it too… the knife divides, whereas the whisk unites (it can fix a broken sauce, for instance).”

When did you get it?

She got her one and only tattoo while training at the California Culinary Academy in San Francisco, at Black + Blue Tattoo, a woman-owned studio in the Mission District.

What was the inspiration?

After quitting a “comfortable but uninspiring” corporate job to do the culinary program full-time, Gough wanted to commemorate taking a leap of faith to follow her passion. “I got the tattoo to remind myself that I could take measured risks like that and still be OK,” she says. “After I got it, my mom warned me that potential employers might not hire me as a result. I laughed and said I didn’t want to work at those kinds of places anyway!”

ZERO WASTE BEAN SOUP

In our 2015 Winter “Skin” issue, edible Hawaiian Islands ran a story called “Culinary Ink,” featuring five incredible local personalities with food-related tattoos. It became one of our most popular issues to date, but we regretted the fact that we didn’t get a chance to highlight any inked women (though not for lack of trying!). This is the long overdue follow-up, where we showcase ladies from four islands who love food so much they’ve creatively stamped themselves with captivating foodie artwork.

ELIZABETH “BETTY” MCDONALD: MAUI

PHOTOGRAPHED BY MIEKO HORIKOSHI
INTERVIEW BY LINDSEY KESEL

Pastry chef Betty McDonald grew up in Rhode Island baking with her mom and grandmothers. “I definitely come from a family that LOVES to eat,” she says. “We are always discussing our next meal! And now I get to share some of my family recipes with others.”

Her husband’s charter boat captain/fishing guide career took them to the keys of Florida, the bush camps of Alaska, and finally Lahaina, Maui eight years ago. She worked in award-winning restaurants for several years before venturing out on her own. Today she runs the wholesale bakery, B3 “A Beach Bunny Bakery.” McDonald caters to Kīhei and Maui’s west side, creating beautiful, palate-pleasing treats for customers and catering weddings and other special events. She’s also a volunteer chef for the Maui Kids Cook With Heart program.

What is your tattoo?

In the elaborate full sleeve on her left arm, there’s a green KitchenAid mixer at the top outer shoulder spilling out pink cream in Japanese style waves. Cupcakes, cupcake pans, and eggs cover her upper arm, with a cherry pie tucked in her inner elbow and a sifter, rolling pin, and measuring spoons on her lower arm. Cherries, strawberries, and chocolates are weaved throughout.

When did you get it?

She got the entire work of art from March to June in 2012, care of a Lahaina tattoo artist.

What was the inspiration?

After admiring a friend’s full sleeve made up of traditional Japanese wave and flowers, she knew she wanted something similar, but tailored to her love of sweets and baking. In the design, she decided to include a jar of jam as a special shoutout to her friend, who is named Jamille.

CHERRY CREAM PIE WITH CALAMANSI BUTTER

In our 2015 Winter “Skin” issue, edible Hawaiian Islands ran a story called “Culinary Ink,” featuring five incredible local personalities with food-related tattoos. It became one of our most popular issues to date, but we regretted the fact that we didn’t get a chance to highlight any inked women (though not for lack of trying!). This is the long overdue follow-up, where we showcase ladies from four islands who love food so much they’ve creatively stamped themselves with captivating foodie artwork.

ERIN EMILY VOSEVICH KELLER: KAUA‘I

ERIN EMILY VOSEVICH KELLER: KAUA‘IPHOTOGRAPHED BY MALLORY FRANCKS
INTERVIEW BY LINDSEY KESEL

On vacation visiting a girlfriend on the Garden Island, Erin Keller got a taste of paradise and an introduction to her future husband. Love was the perfect excuse to return several times during the summer of 2015, and to apply for an executive chef position at a resort restaurant in Princeville. She got the job and became a Hawai‘i resident by October. A few months later, the couple decided to go all in and open a restaurant together. Today at The Local Kaua‘i, she runs the back of the house while her husband, Jose, handles business in the front.

What is your tattoo?

Keller has two large branches of wheat inked on her left forearm that are tattooed in Realism style, known for its signature intricate detail.

When did you get it?

Right before her official move to Kaua‘i, she walked into a Portland tattoo parlor with stalks of wheat in her hand. The artist photocopied the stalks and traced them on to her arm to duplicate the actual size and detail of the grain.

What was the inspiration?

Cooking professionally since 2006, Keller spent most of her time crafting dishes for inspiring chefs in Portland, Oregon, before owning her own spot. “I found fresh wheat at the Farmers Market one day in a flower arrangement and it was the most beautiful thing I had ever seen,” she says. “I was slinging pizza out of my mobile wood-fired pizza oven and I was in full-on pizza-loving, wheat-loving, pro-gluten mode.” Before saying goodbye to the City of Roses, she scheduled a tandem tattoo appointment with her best friend, Amanda, the executive chef at Portland City Grill. “We both got tattooed on the last day that I lived in Portland before I moved to Hawai‘i,” she says. “Great memories all around.”

PIZZA WITH PAPAYA JAM, BACON AND BRIE

In our 2015 Winter “Skin” issue, edible Hawaiian Islands ran a story called “Culinary Ink,” featuring five incredible local personalities with food-related tattoos. It became one of our most popular issues to date, but we regretted the fact that we didn’t get a chance to highlight any inked women (though not for lack of trying!). This is the long overdue follow-up, where we showcase ladies from four islands who love food so much they’ve creatively stamped themselves with captivating foodie artwork.

Letter of Aloha

Aloha and welcome to 2018. All of us at edible Hawaiian Islands wish you excellent health, more happiness than your heart can hold, and continued success.

I grew up in Redondo Beach, California. My mother, Yuriko (Lily) was Japanese and my father, Joseph, was Polish. They were both immigrants and told the story of their family history through the food we grew in our backyard garden and the meals they prepared for our family of five. During meals, we sat Japanese style, or seiza-style, on large floor pillows at a low table. Breakfast, perhaps our most important meal, was miso, teriyaki fish, white rice and pickled vegetables or homemade Kielbasa sausage, smoked in our backyard, with eggs from our chickens.

Moving to Hawaii in 1987 felt like coming home, the cultures here mimicking that of my own upbringing. The foods, families and tradition of learning about family history through the foods we grow, prepare and eat together all felt comfortably familiar. You’ll read stories reflecting these values throughout this issue.

We would like to encourage you to get back into the kitchen, cook dinner, and invite friends and family to your table. I recently had some friends over for dinner at my home, nothing fancy, but the joy of hosting dinner guests filled my soul and it was the highlight of my week. It’s now a regular event, so if you find yourself on Maui on a Friday night, please join us for dinner.

Deep in my being, I feel so blessed to live in Hawaii. As many of you know, though, the islands can easily become isolated in the event of a disaster, natural or otherwise. Please make it a point to prepare your home and family during this unnerving time, when I feel is not a matter of if but when our safety measures will need to be called upon. This is a responsibility we all share living in an island community in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. In this vein, we sympathize with the members of our edible ‘ohana who have been struck by natural disasters in California, Texas and Florida, and we hope their communities return stronger than ever before.

With aloha,
Dania Novack-Katz
Publisher / Editor

Teriyaki Sauce

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MIEKO HORIKOSHI

At the edible Hawaiian Islands test kitchen we often open our own refrigerator for inspiration. In past issues we have been inspired to make our own basic condiments such as butter, mayonnaise, mustard, and ketchup. How could we have overlooked the most popular condiment in Hawaii — teriyaki sauce? Teriyaki sauce originates in Japan. The word teriyaki derives from the noun teri, which refers to a shine or luster given by the sugar content, and yaki which refers to the cooking method of grilling or broiling. Like most recipes you can adjust some of the ingredients to suit your taste.

INGREDIENTS:

¾ cup soy sauce (for gluten-free use Tamari)
½ cup cane sugar
½ teaspoon fresh ginger, peeled and grated
2 medium garlic cloves, minced
2 green onions, minced fine
2 tablespoons mirin
½ teaspoon arrowroot

METHOD:

In a small saucepan combine all ingredients except arrowroot. Heat on medium low. Wisk in arrowroot until lumps are gone. Bring sauce to a boil, whisk and reduce to ¾ cup. Sauce will turn into a syrupy glaze. Use immediately, or allow to cool and store in a glass jar in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks.

Hawaiian Style Bloody Mary

TOMATO JUICE INGREDIENTS:

1 pound vine-ripened tomatoes
1 cup celery leaves
¼ cup chopped onion
¼ cup fresh pineapple
3 tablespoons sugar
Black pepper to taste

TOMATO JUICE METHOD:

Add all ingredients to a medium stainless-steel pot
and cook for 45 minutes. Allow to cool and strain
through sieve, chinois or food mill. Chill in glass jar.

BLOODY MARY INGREDIENTS:

¼ cup (2 ounces) homemade tomato juice
3 tablespoons (1 ½ ounces) vodka
3 tablespoons (1 ½ ounces) pineapple juice
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
3/4 teaspoon freshly grated horseradish
3 dashes hot pepper sauce
1 pinch salt
1 dash black pepper, freshly ground
¼ teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1 fresh pineapple spear
About 1 cup ice cubes

BLOODY MARY METHOD:

Combine homemade tomato juice, vodka, Worcestershire sauce, horseradish, hot sauce, salt, pepper and lemon juice in a shaker. Fill an 11oz highball glass with ice, and add pineapple spear. Pour Bloody Mary mixture into the glass.

AMERICA THE COOKBOOK

Written By Evan Ryan & Lehua Vander Velde
Format: Softcover
Size: 10 5/8 x 7 1/8 in
Pages: 788
Illustrations: 200 illustrations
ISBN: 9780714873961

With 800 home-cooking recipes, America: The Cookbook is a celebration of the remarkable diversity of American food and food culture state by state. Features 50 essays and menus from a ‘who’s who’ of 100 foremost food experts and chefs.

America: The Cookbook is the first book to document comprehensively – and celebrate – the remarkable diversity of American cuisine and food culture. A thoroughly researched compendium of 800 home-cooking recipes for delicious and authentic American dishes, America: The Cookbook explores the country’s myriad traditions and influences, regional favorites and melting-pot fusion – the culinary heritage of a nation, from appetizers to desserts and beyond. A unique state-by-state section features essays and menus from a ‘who’s who’ of 100 foremost food experts and chefs.

BEAN TO BAR CHOCOLATE

Written By Megan Giller
Format: Hardback
Size: 6.5 x 8 inch
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781612128214

Author Megan Giller invites fellow chocoholics on a fascinating journey through America’s craft chocolate revolution. Learn what to look for in a chocolate bar and how to successfully pair chocolate with coffee, beer, spirits, cheese, and bread. This comprehensive celebration of chocolate busts some popular myths (like “white chocolate isn’t chocolate”) and introduces you to more than a dozen of the hottest artisanal chocolate makers in the US today. You’ll get a taste for the chocolate-making pro-cess and how chocolate’s flavor depends on where the cocoa beans were grown — then turn your artisanal bars into unexpected treats with 22 recipes from master chefs.

NA HOALOHA FARMS SWEET POTATO

BY MIEKO HORIKOSHI

RECIPE COURTESY OF ALOHA MIXED PLATE

SERVES TWO

INGREDIENTS:

8 ounce steamed Okinawan sweet potato, large diced
2 tablespoons honey tahini (recipe below)
1 tablespoon chopped salted almonds
1 tablespoon chopped salted macadamia nuts
1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
3 Thai basil leaves, torn

METHOD:

Place sweet potato on a plate, top with honey tahini, almonds, macadamia nuts and sesame seeds. Finish with Thai basil leaves.

HONEY TAHINI INGREDIENTS:

1 cup tahini
¼ cup honey
½ teaspoon Tahitian vanilla paste
1/8 cup water
Pinch of salt

METHOD:

Blend all ingredients together by hand.