Category: Recipe Wave

MAUI SALAD

RECIPE COURTESY OF CHEF HILARY BARSBY
IMAGES BY BARRY FRANKEL PHOTOGRAPHY

Serves 4/8

This salad gets rave reviews at the retreats I cook for a few times a year. The dressing doesn’t have garlic, as I have several clients with sensitivities. Add a clove to the dressing if you wish.

SALAD INGREDIENTS:

1 bag Kumu Farms mixed greens

1 heart of palm

1 avocado

3 medium-sized roasted Chioggia beets

1/2 cup toasted macadamia nuts

1 bag sunflower sprouts

SALAD METHOD:

> Wash and spin salad greens.

> Shave heart of palm, and set aside.

> Dice or slice avocado into strips.

> Peel and cube beets, and roast in 375-degree oven with avocado oil, salt and thyme for 20 minutes or until tender.

> Place raw macadamia nuts on sheet tray. Bake in 350-degree oven until toasted, 5-7 minutes.

DRESSING INGREDIENTS (makes 1 pint):

1 preserved Meyer lemon, rinse well before making dressing

½ cup fresh tarragon, stripped from thick stem

2 tablespoons local honey

1 1/2 cups Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Sea salt and black pepper to taste

DRESSING METHOD:

> Place all ingredients into a high-speed blender (such as a Vitamix or Blendtech), and blend for 15 seconds or until smooth.<span class=”Apple-converted-space”> </span>

> Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Thin the dressing with a splash of water if it is too thick.

ASSEMBLY METHOD:

> Place greens into salad bowl with some of the beets, heart of palm and sprouts.

> Toss with 3 tablespoons of dressing to start and add more to your liking.

> Place onto plates and garnish with additional ingredients.

>Grind fresh sea salt and black pepper over the top.

Chef Hilary is a Maui Culinary Academy graduate, with a secondary degree in plant-based cuisine. She has been a private chef on Maui for the last 2.5 years serving private clients and retreats island wide. Her main passion is healthy food preparation and helping clients with food allergies and restrictions.

Featured Farms: Kumu Farms, Ono Farms and Kahanu Aina Greens

WHAT MAKES A GREAT SALAD?

Here in the edible Hawaiian Islands test kitchen we constantly have conversations about food that tend to lead to food-related questions for which there really is no right or wrong answer. We all agree that taste is subjective, but, once the conversation starts going, we often find a common thread that connects the dots. When we were thinking about our spring issue we had so many strong opinions about what makes a great salad that we ended up making a flow chart.

HERE’S WHAT WE AGREED UPON THIS TIME:

The salad must have greens and vegetables, though the vegetables may be raw, grilled, pickled or cooked. The dressing is always a combination of oil and acid, with an optional creamy component. Salt is a must, as well as something to add a bit of crunch such as seeds, croutons or toasted nuts. We all agree that texture is key and sticking to fresh and local ingredients is a must. Finally, assembling a good salad is an intersection of science and art as we hope to display over the next eight pages. 

We invited a chef from each Hawaiian island to share a salad recipe, along with some of their favorite farms to work with, and then we invited a talented photographer to capture images of these edible works of art before they’re gone! Make your own favorite salad combination, snap a photo, and share it on @instagram and tag us @ediblehi. 

Squash & Farro Salad

Raw Pad Thai

Maui Salad

Farmhale Salad

FARMHALE SALAD

RECIPE COURTESY OF CHEF HOLLY HADSELL EL HAJJI
IMAGES BY BARRY FRANKEL PHOTOGRAPHY
Serves 2/4

SALAD INGREDIENTS:

1 cup Frisee lettuce 

1 cup Sassy Greens 

2 small beets, sliced thin 

2 small purple radishes, sliced thin 

1 keiki cucumber, sliced thin 

½ cup grape tomatoes, cut in half 

1 stem Purplette Green Onion, chopped 

¼ cup Sunrise Papaya, chopped

¼ cup Big Island Macadamia Nuts, toasted & chopped 

¼ cup feta cheese 

6 cornmeal croutons 

¼ cup passion-orange-guava dressing

CORNMEAL CROUTON INGREDIENTS:

2 cups milk

2 cups water

1 cup local cornmeal 

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1/2 cup parmesan cheese (freshly grated)

2 teaspoons vegetable oil (plus more for frying)

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

CORNMEAL CROUTONS METHOD:

> In a sauce pan bring water to a boil. 

> When at a boil, slowly whisk in cornmeal, and add salt and pepper. 

> Remove from heat and add butter and cheese. 

> Pour cornmeal onto an oiled baking pan and smooth out with a spatula. 

> Refrigerate until chilled.

> Cut into 1” X 1” cubes.

> Fill a large, heavy-bottomed pot with vegetable oil. Heat to 360. 

> Fry cubes in batches for about two minutes, then remove and drain on paper towels.

> Season with salt and pepper.

DRESSING INGREDIENTS:

¼ cup sherry vinegar 

¼ teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped

¼ cup POG Syrup

1 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

DRESSING METHOD:

Place all ingredients in mason jar, screw lid on, and shake until emulsified.

Holly Hadsell El Hajji’s company Pacific Events & Catering is Hawaii’s leader in catering to the private aviation industry. They provide their services on Oahu, Maui and Kauai, and will be opening on the Island of Hawaii in the Fall of 2019. Pacific Catering also caters events from 2 to 10,000 guests.

Featured Farms: Ma’o Farms, Ho Farms, Naked Cow Dairy and Counter Culture

HUMMUS

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM EDIBLE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARRY FRANKEL PHOTOGRAPHY

No electricity? No problem! This hummus recipe is super easy to make in a mortar and pestle. Find the youngest, most energetic keiki and put them to work, washing their hands first. As with all recipes, you can adjust the recipe to your taste. You can eat the hummus on it’s own or smear it on chips, bread or add it to any sandwich. Since water maybe limited just drain the garbanzo beans but save the juice for this recipe.

INGREDIENTS

2 14oz cans garbanzo beans

4 teaspoons tahini

1 clove of garlic

4 tablespoons olive oil

¼ cup of lemon juice or any other acid

½ teaspoon ground cumin

Salt and pepper to taste

Liquid from the garbanzo beans

METHOD

> Add garlic, salt and pepper to mortar and pestle and grind to a paste.

> Mix in tahini and lemon juice.

> Add garbanzo beans a little at a time alternating with juice from the garbanzo beans until you achieve the right texture and taste.

> Finish with olive oil.

CREAM OF CHICKEN SOUP

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM EDIBLE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARRY FRANKEL PHOTOGRAPHY

Ok, we know what you’re thinking – Really? Canned soup? – but imagine a natural disaster, days on end without electricity or running water, you need to feed your family 3+ meals a day and you’ve run out of creative ideas. Planning ahead to ensure your family is fed and nourished is probably the most important job other than keeping them safe. Step up and think ahead now – you can thank us later.

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

2 15oz cans cream of chicken soup

2 15oz cans coconut milk

2 5oz cans chopped chicken

2 15oz cans diced potatoes

1 2oz can diced green chilies

1 15oz can corn

1 5oz can peas

¼ cup of fried onions

Fresh pepper

METHOD

> Open all canned goods and heat gently just until warmed. Top with pepper and fried onions just before serving.

TIP

Wipe clean the tops of all canned goods before opening.

VEGETARIAN BURGERS

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM EDIBLE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARRY FRANKEL PHOTOGRAPHY

The shelf-stable ingredients in these burgers make them a go-to for storms, when grocery store shelves may be left bare, but they’re also delicious enough to be eaten all year round. They are easy to make and you can substitute any combination of canned beans and starch that you may have on hand.

Makes 4 burgers

INGREDIENTS

1 15 oz can garbanzo beans, drained

1 15 oz can sweet potatoes, drained

1 clove of garlic

2 teaspoons dried parsley

1 teaspoon cumin

1 teaspoon dried lemon zest

¼ cup flour

Salt and pepper

Oil for cooking

METHOD

> Using a mortar and pestle, grind up garlic, salt, pepper, cumin and lemon zest.

> Drain beans and potatoes, reserve liquid.

> With clean hands, mix all ingredients in a large bowl and form 4 patties.

> Cook patties on a plancha until cooked and browned on both sides.

> Serve on a bun with ketchup and mustard packets.

BEAN SALAD

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM EDIBLE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARRY FRANKEL PHOTOGRAPHY

This is an adapted recipe for a traditional 3 bean salad – green beans, kidney beans and garbanzo beans. When we checked our storage pantry, we had other varieties of beans so we adapted the recipe and added fried onions for a little crunch.

INGREDIENTS

1 15oz can green beans, drained

1 15oz can black beans, drained

1 12oz can lima beans, drained

1 15oz can sliced carrots, drained

1 15 oz can dark kidney beans, drained

1 15oz can of corn, drained

2 tablespoons of any acid, such as lemon juice or vinegar

Black pepper to taste

Fried onions

METHOD

> Combine all drained canned goods in a large bowl.

> Mix in vinegar dressing, and top with fried onions.

TIP

Save all the liquid for another use.

This bean salad will taste better ice cold. Make the salad in large zip lock bag and find a water source to chill salad before serving.

CORN CAKES

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM EDIBLE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARRY FRANKEL PHOTOGRAPHY

Ask most keiki (children) about their first foray into pancake making, and many will remember Bisquick playing a central role. Once sold in a box, Bisquick now comes in a wide-mouth, easy-pour container. It’s a perfect opportunity to turn breakfast into dinner by adding a few ingredients.

INGREDIENTS

1 10.6 oz Shake ‘n Pour Bisquick

1½ cups water

1 5 oz can corn

Canned green chilies

Dried parsley

Chili flakes

METHOD

> Follow label instructions, adding your chosen ingredients to the wet mix. Pour and cook on a flat griddle.

> Add corn, green chilies, chili flakes and drizzle with honey for a Southwestern flavor.

> Try replacing water with canned coconut milk, adding coconut flakes and crushed macadamia nuts, and serving with coconut syrup.

> Or try adding finely chopped apples, walnuts and cinnamon and topping with applesauce.

CANNED TUNA

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM EDIBLE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARRY FRANKEL PHOTOGRAPHY

Sure, anyone can open a can of tuna and eat it right out of the can. But in a disaster, around day 5, you may start dreaming about something more delicious. Prepare now by adding some extra spices, oils and vinegars to your emergency pantry box so you can dress up some simple recipes.

INGREDIENTS

2 5oz cans of tuna, we prefer white albacore, packed in water

1 onion, chopped fine

2 teaspoons of capers, drained

1 teaspoon lemon juice or juice from the capers

Pinch of black pepper

Olive oil, optional

METHOD

> Open and drain tuna, reserving liquid.

> Add finely chopped onion, capers, lemon juice and pepper.

> Stir to combine. Add olive oil if desired.

> Add liquid from tuna to you pet’s dry mix. Give them a special treat too.

MAKING CANNED FOOD DELICIOUS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARRY FRANKEL PHOTOGRAPHY

AFTER THE MASSIVE RAINFALL AND FLOODING on Kauai last April, we had the opportunity to speak to a group of people who live off the grid just north of Hanalei. They requested not to be named in this story, but shared some profound experiences of their food journey with our magazine.

A few of these folks have lived off the land for years, preparing and eating only food that they grew. It was mostly taro, greens, herbs, coconuts, tropical fruit, and fresh-caught fish. Even salt was gathered right from the shoreline.

The 50 inches of rain that fell in just over a 24 hours brought floods that came and washed away their farmland, home, and way of life. The community stepped in and brought canned food and fresh water in via a small motorboat.

After day five of eating just canned food they craved anything fresh, ice cold, or raw. “We didn’t ever plan for a disaster and never imagined we would eat canned food,” they said. They felt the absence of the simplest of spices – like pepper – anything that could add some texture and complexity to their emergency rations.

This story inspired us to think of ways we could doctor up some basic, non-perishable meals, should we find ourselves in a similar situation. Here are six recipes we created or adapted from our archives to get us through a time of want in the wake of a natural disaster. They say hunger is the best sauce, but a little bit of seasoning can go a long way, too, so remember when you’re buying canned food for your storage – don’t forget the spices!

BEAN SALAD

HUMMUS

CREAM OF CHICKEN SOUP

CORN CAKES

VEGETARIAN BURGERS

CANNED TUNA