Maui County Farm Tours

BULLY’S BURGERS
Horse & Farm Tour
15900 Piilani Hwy, Kula, HI 96790
808-878-1363
www.bullysburgersmauistore.com

COCONUT INFORMATION
Coconut Cooking Classes
11 Kane Rd Haiku HI 96708
www.coconutinformation.com

MAUI CHOCOLATE TOUR
Cacao Farm Tour
78 Ulupono St. Suite 1
Lahaina, HI 96761
808-793-6651
www.mauichocolatetour.com

MAUI DRAGON FRUIT FARM
Dragonfruit & Tasting Tours
833 Punakea Loop,
Lahaina, HI 96761
808-264-6127
www.mauidragonfruit.com

MAUI GOLD BEE TOURS
Honey & Bee Tour
883 Hali’imaile Road, Hali’imaile HI 96768
808-793-4660
www.mauigoldbeetour.com

MAUI NUI BOTANICAL GARDENS
Ethnobotany Tour
150 Kanaloa Avenue,
Kahului, HI 96732
808-249-2798
www.mnbg.org

MAUI PINEAPPLE TOURS
Maui’s Only Pineapple Tour
883 Hali’imaile Road, Hali’imaile HI 96768
808-665-5491
www.mauipineappletour.com

MAUI TEA FARM
Tea Tours & Tastings
18303 Haleakala Highway
Kula, HI 96790
855-766-6808
mauiteafarm.com

PONO GROWN FARM
Farm Tours
677 Olinda Road
Makawao, HI 96768
808-269-9356
www.Ponogrown.org

PUNAKEA PALMS COCONUT FARM & TASTING TOUR
Coconut Tours and Cafe
225 Punakea Loop,
Lahaina, HI 96761
808-269-4455
www.punakeapalms.com
MAUI BEES
Bee Tour, Farm Tour and Cafe
150 Pulehu Nui Rd.
Kula, Hawaii 96790
808-913-1633
www.mauibees.com

HALE AKUA GARDEN & ECO-RETREAT CENTER
Farm Tour
110 Door of Faith Rd,
Haiku HI 96708
808-633-1260
www.haleakua.org

SURFING GOAT DAIRY
Goat Cheese Tasting & Tour
3651 Omaopio Rd
Kula HI 96790
808-878-2870
www.surfinggoatdairy.com

THE MAUI FARM
Farm Tour
P. O. Box 1776,
Makawao HI 96768
808-579-8271
www.themauifarm.org

PURDY’S MACADAMIA NUT FARM
Macadamia Nut Tasting & Tour
2240 Lihi Pali Ave,
Ho’olehua, HI 96729
808-567-6601
www.molokai-aloha.com

PUU O HOKU RANCH FARM TOUR
Farm Tour
13600 Kamehameha V Highway,
Ho‘olehua, HI 96729
808-558-8109
www.Puuohoku.com

Kaua‘i Farm Tours

FEHRING FAMILY FARM
Farm Tours, Farm Stays & Events
4320 Wailapa Road,
Kiluea HI 96754
808-652-5274
www.fehringfamilyfarm.com

GROVE FARM MUSEUM
Sugar Cane History
4050 Nawiliwili Road,
Lihue HI 96766
808-845-3202
www.grovefarm.org

HO’OPULAPULA HARAGUCHI RICE MILL
Taro & Rice Farm Tours
5-5070 Kuhio Highway #A,
Hanalei HI 96714
808-651-3399
www.haraguchiricemill.org

KAUAI COFFEE PLANTATION
Coffee Tours
870 Halewilli Road,
Kalaheo HI 96766
808-545-8605
www.kauaicoffee.com

KAUAI FARMACY
Farm Tours, Tastings & Shop
4731 G Kuawa Road,
Kilauea HI 96754
808-828-6525
www.kauaifarmacy.com

KAUAI SUGARLOAF PINEAPPLE FARM TOUR
White Pineapple
PO Box 533, Kilauea HI 96754 808-635-0061
www.kauaisugarloaf.com

KILOHANA PLANTATION
Locally Grown Fruits & Vegetables
3-2087 Kaumualii Highway,
Lihue HI 96766
808-245-5609
www.kilohanakauai.com

KOLOA RUM COMPANY STORE & TASTING ROOM
Locally Made Rum Tasting Room
3-2087 Kaumualii Hwy,
Lihue HI 96766
808-246-8900
www.koloarum.com/tasting-room

LYDGATE FARMS
Chocolate Farm Tours
5730 Olohena Road,
Kapa’a HI 96746
808-821-1857
www.lydgatefarms.com

NANI MOON MEADERY
Mead Tasting Room
4-939 D Kuhio Highway,
Kapa’a HI 96746
808-651-2453
www.nanimoonmead.com

NATIONAL TROPICAL BOTANICAL GARDEN
Spouting Horn Park
4425 Lawa’i Road, Koloa 96756
808-742-2623
www.ntbg.org

THE VANILLERY OF KAUAI
Vanilla
5956 Lokelani Road,
Kapa’a HI 96746
503-807-8329
www.Vanillery.com

Hawai‘i Island Farm Tours

BIG ISLAND BEES
Bee Museum & Tours Honey Tasting
82-1140 Meli Road,
Captain Cook, HI 96704
808-328-1315
www.bigislandbees.com

HAWAIIAN CROWN HILO & CHOCOLATE FACTORY
Cacao Tour
160 Kilauea Ave, Hilo, HI 96720
808-319-6158
www.hawaiiancrownchocolate.com

HILO SHARK’S COFFEE
Cacao, Vanilla & Coffee Tours
27-220 Ka’apoko Homestead Road Papaikou, HI 96781
808-895-6600
www.hilosharkscoffee.com

HIP AGRICULTURE
Farm Tours
52-4700
Akoni Pule Hwy, Kapaau, HI 96755
808-896-1331
www.starseedranch.com

JOE’S NUTS
Macadamia Nut Tour & Tasting
84-5180 Painted Church Rd
Captain Cook, HI 96704
www.JoesNuts.com

KAHI OLA MAU FARM
Cacao Tasting & Farm Tour
45-3584 Old Mamalahoa Hwy, Honokaa, HI 96727
808-494-2129
www.honokaachocolateco.com

LAVALOHA
Cacao Tour
1820 Amauulu Rd, Hilo HI 96720
808-987-3649
www.Lavaloha.com

OK FARMS
Exclusive Farm & Waterfall Tour
1570 Maikalani Street,
Hilo HI 96720
808-934-9200
www.okfarmshawaii.com

OLA BREW CO.
Beer & Cider Tours
74-5598 Luhia Street
Kailua-Kona, HI 96740
808-339-3599
www.olabrewco.com

ORIGINAL HAWAIIAN CHOCOLATE FACTORY
Cacao Tours
78-6772 Makenawai St,
Kailua-Kona, HI 96740
808-322-2626
www.ohcf.us

PUNA CHOCOLATE CO. FACTORY/CHOCOLATE SHOP
Cacao Tour
74-5606 Pawai Place, Brewery
Block Bay 8, Kailua-Kona, HI 96740
Two Cocoa Farm Tour Locations; Puna & Kona
808-489-9899
www.PunaChocolate.com

PUNA GOLD ESTATE
Caco, Coffee & Bee Tours
808-935-0550
www.Punagoldestate.com

ATTAINABLE SUSTAINABLE: THE LOST ART OF SELF-RELIANT LIVING

Packed with delicious recipes, natural remedies, gardening tips, crafts, and more, this indispensable lifestyle reference makes earth-friendly living fun, real, and easy. Whether you live in a city, suburb, or on land in the country, this essential guide for the backyard homesteader will help you achieve a homespun life–from starting your own garden and pickling the food you grow to pressing wildflowers, baking sourdough loaves, quilting, raising chickens, and creating your own natural cleaning supplies. In these beautifully illustrated pages, makers will find an indispensable home reference for sustainability in the 21st century. Delve into enticing recipes and step-by-step directions for creating fun, cost-efficient projects that will bring out your inner pioneer. Filled with more than 300 color photographs, this relatable, comprehensive book contains time honored-wisdom and modern know-how for getting back to basics.

Size: 7.6” x 9.8” Softcover ISBN-13: 978-1426220548

Hawai‘i Island Farmers’ Coffee & Tea Tours

GREENWELL FARMS COFFEE TOURS
Coffee Tours
81-6581 Mamalahoa Highway, Kealakekua HI 96750
808-323-2295
www.greenwellfarms.com

HALA TREE COFFEE
Coffee Farm
82-5966 Mamalahoa Highway, Captain Cook HI 96704
808-238-5005
www.halatreecoffee.com

HEAVENLY HAWAIIAN FARMS
Coffee Tours
78-1136 Bishop Road, Holualoa HI 96725
808-322-7720
www.heavenlyhawaiian.com

HILO COFFEE MILL
Coffee Tours
17-995 Volcano Highway, Mountain View HI 96771
808-968-1333
www.hilocoffeemill.com

KONA JOE COFFEE
Coffee Tours
79-7346 Mamalahoa Highway, Kealakekua HI 96750
808-322-2100
www.konajoe.com

KU’U COFFEE MILL
Coffee Tours
96-2694 Wood Valley Road,
Pahala HI 96777
808-928-0550
www.kaucoffeemill.com

LION’S GATE FARMS
Coffee Tours
84-5085 Mamalahoa Highway, Captain Cook HI 96704
808-989-4883
www.coffeeofkona.com

LONG EARS COFFEE
Coffee Tours
46-3689 Waipahi Place,
Honoka’a HI 96727
808-775-0385
www.longearscoffee.com

MAUNA KEA TEA
Tea Tours
46-3870 Old Mamaloa Highway, Honoka’a HI 96727
808-775-1171
www.maunakeatea.com

ROOSTER FARMS
Coffee Tours
84-1245 Bruner Road, Captain Cook, HI 96704
808-315-5224
www.roosterfarms.com

SUNSHOWER FARMS
Coffee Tours
6-1297 Waiono Ranch Road, Holualoa, HI 96725
808-443-6330
www.sunshowercoffee.com

TEA HAWAII & COMPANY
Tea Tours
Volcano Hawaii
808-967-7637
www.teahawaii.com

UESHIMA COFFEE
Coffee Tours
75-5568 Mamalahoa Highway, Holualoa, HI 96725
808-322-3789
www.ucc-hawaii.com

WAILELE ESTATE PLANTATION
Coffee Tours
78-6750 Makenawai Street,
Kailua-Kona, HI 96740
808-324-0003
www.wailelekona.coffee

BIG ISLAND TEA
Tea Tours
18-2465 N Glenwood Road
Mountain View, HI 96771

MAKING YOUR OWN POI

RECIPE AND PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY edible HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

INGREDIENTS:
Taro
Water

METHOD:

1. Harvest taro variety of your choice. Clean and remove any excess dirt

2. Steam or boil until taro is cooked. It’s important that taro is cooked thoroughly*.

3. Cool thoroughly and with the back of a spoon peel any remaining skin.

4. Cut cooked taro in chunks and pound until desired consistency. At this stage its called pai’i’ai. To make poi add more water to desired consistency and allow it to ferment for 24-48 hours at room temperature in a covered container.

TIP: Some varieties of taro contain tiny crystals called calcium oxalate, a natural pesticide. If taro is not cooked thoroughly and eaten it can cause your mouth and throat to itch and burn.

MAKING THIS RECIPE?
Share it with us on Instagram using #ediblehi so we can see what you’re cooking in your kitchen!

TARO COCONUT CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES

INGREDIENTS:

½ cup (1 stick) butter, room temperature

½ cup granulated sugar

½ cup brown sugar

2 eggs, room temperature

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 cups flour

1 cup taro chips, crushed

½ cup unsweetened coconut flakes

1 teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon salt

1 cup white chocolate chips

METHOD:

1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees, and line a cookie sheet with parchment paper.

2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, or in a large bowl using a hand mixer cream together butter and both sugars until light and fluffy.

3. Add eggs one at a time and then beat in vanilla extract.

4. In a large bowl sift together flour, baking soda, and salt. Add taro chips and coconut. Add to the wet mixture in three additions, then stir in white chocolate chips.

5. Place about a tablespoon of batter an inch apart on the prepared baking sheets. Bake for 8-12 minutes until the edges start to brown. Cool on sheet about 5 minutes before placing on a wire cooling rack until cooled completely.

FARM TO KEIKI: COOKING, GARDENING AND NUTRITION WITH CHILDREN

Tina Kamen’s book, Farm to Keiki: Cooking, Gardening and Nutrition with Children, is a wonderful resource for teachers in Hawai‘i. As someone who works with future early childhood educators, finding Hawai‘i specific materials for growing food, respecting the ‘āina, and taking a holistic approach to developing healthy lifestyles in the early years has been challenging. However, after using Tiana’s book, the students were incredibly excited to use it in their practices with young children, and could easily connect to the lessons, recipes, and guidance presented throughout. I look forward to using this text in the years to come, as it already is, and will continue to be, an invaluable resource for our island communities!

Brooke Rehmann, MA

Professor of Early Childhood Education – University of Hawai’i 

Pages: 179

Cover: Spiral, Hard Cover

ISBN: Self Published

Size: 11” x 8.5”

NOURISH – The Revitalization of Foodways in Hawaii

This book, NOURISH The Revitalization of Foodways in Hawaii comes out of community passion and the desire to re-root, and re-route, what truly nourishes us in Hawai’i. Tracing foodways allows us to see that so many struggles are interconnected: changing seas and storms, disease patterns, health disparities that follow ethnicity and income levels, the lack and soil in urban areas, the risk of making a living as a small farmer, reliance on barges and pesticides and our disconnections from the food on our plate, our farmers and food service workers, and from our land and water.

This book demonstrates, our struggles demand multiple voices debating challenging, and chorusing over our shared passion for sustainable food, and the courage to re-center nourishment. They require the courage to honor our different experiences, hopes, dreams, and ancestries, while at the same time recognize the roles we have to play together in creating and enacting a larger story about our shared home and futures

Pages: 126

Cover: Soft, Perfect Binding

ISBN: 978-0-9898320-4-5

Size: 10.5” x 8”

CRACK SEED

WRITTEN BY MELISSA CHANG 

AN AUTHENTIC TAKE ON HAWAII THROUGH IMMIGRATED CULTURE 

ASK ANYONE WHO GREW UP in Hawaii what they love about crack seed, and the salivary glands at the back of their jawlines will react with a quick, strong tingling as they remember their favorite, small-kid-time treat. 

Rock salt plum! Lemon peel! Honey ginger! And across the board, everyone will have an opinion about the tart and super salty li hing mui. The funny thing is, very few people know what the specific “crack seed” is anymore. 

Here’s a quick history lesson on this favorite local treat: Li hing mui (旅行梅) means “traveling plum,” which was the perfect thing to take on a long trip across the Pacific Ocean. These preserved fruits — particularly li hing mui — were brought to Hawaii in the mid-1800s by immigrant workers from Zhongshan, China. 

Although li hing mui is dried to the point that each one resembles a rock, most of the other preserved fruits are moist or soft. In one preparation, the seed of the fruit is cracked open to enhance the sweet and salty flavors of the syrup it is soaked in. This is the original version of “crack seed,” which is rarely, if ever, sold anymore — probably because it could potentially injure your mouth if you don’t eat it carefully. 

When it was widely available, crack seed was weighed and served in brown paper bags. Snackers would eat the meat of the dried fruit, then suck on the seeds and seed fragments, then turn the paper bags inside out to enjoy the sticky flavored syrup left behind. (The emergence of plastic bags was a much cleaner alternative.) 

Although Chinese candy stores sold every kind of Asian preserved fruit imaginable, including crack seed, the term “crack seed” came to be the general term for anything sold in there. These treasured local snacks have evolved over the years, but Hawaii’s craving for that flavor profile has not. In fact, it’s amazing to see what big business these humble treats have become. 

Through high school and college, I worked at what was then one of the oldest crack seed stores (and an original Ala Moana Center tenant), Crack Seed Center. If you were around in the 1980s, you might have seen me amidst the 50 or so glass jars filled with every variety of the preserved, dried fruits: about a dozen different kinds of wet and dry li hing mui, a dozen gingers, three kinds of rock salt plum, wet and dry lemon peel, several versions of shredded mango and mango seed, even a few different presentations of olives. We even had rare, special items like baby seed, apple seed, cherry seed, kam cho mui (aficionados will recognize it as the one that looks like horse poop) and, yes, even traditional crack seed. 

The dry seeds tend to be much saltier than all the rest, cured in licorice and a blend of salt, sugar and other unknown spices to create unique sensations of sweet, sweet-sour, or extra salty. 

The wet seeds tend to be sweeter, with a more jammy profile. True old school seed shops will add simple syrup to kick up the sugar flavor, or salt — preferably rock salt — to offer a more salty-sweet plum with crunch. 

If you’re new to crack seed, I usually recommend you start with the milder wet ones and work your way up to the ones with more concentrated flavors. If you start with li hing mui, you may feel like you’re eating pure salt. 

Due to the extreme salty, sour, or sweet sensations, many people use crack seeds in home remedies when sick. The most common one is li hing mui or lemon peel for sore threats, as the salt helps to soothe the scratchiness. Many of my customers swore by eating red cured peaches with brandy when dealing with a cold, but I usually cut up a preserved lemon and throw it into hot tea. 

The seeds are typically shipped from Asia in 25-pound bags. Back then, the li hing mui bags would always have a lot of the salt, sugar and spices at the bottom. My coworkers and I used to save the powder to add custom touches to our rock salt plums, apricots and mangoes, as well as for kakimochi upon request. 

It was probably this unique touch that made the Crack Seed Center seeds much more delicious. Actor Robert Conrad, when in Hawaii filming “Jake and the Fat Man,” would often send his assistant to buy five pounds of rock salt plum #85 at a time — his favorite munchies between takes. 

We also experimented with li hing powder on our own snacks, as an exclusive perk for people who worked in the store. Oddly enough, we never thought to market the intensely salty powder as a separate ingredient.

You can imagine our surprise — and regret — many years later, when some genius figured out how to sell that precious powder, even to the point of grinding li hing mui seeds to make more of it. Today, you can find the powder sold in bags at stores, used as an enhancer for almost everything, including: salad dressing, margaritas, fruit sprinkles, cookies, barbecue ribs, gummy candies and shave ice. Mixed with simple syrup, it makes an amazing and addicting addition to the popular Icee drinks. 

The combination of old school snacks and contemporary snacks continues with a recently booming trend in mincing dried lemon peel and sprinkling it on gummy candies. Lemon peel is also salty, but has a milder flavor than li hing mui, plus the citrus essence. 

Lemon peel on candy has become such a huge trend that even the wholesalers can’t keep up with the demand. Seed City in Pearlridge is often sold out of lemon peel. Sing Cheong Yuan in Chinatown, which also owns the Crack Seed Store in Kaimuki, sells bags of lemon peel pre-minced so you can sprinkle it on your favorite confection to your liking. 

My niece, Morgen, loves to eat her li hing mui in a different way now: Big Island Candies in Hilo takes the seeds and dips them halfway in chocolate, which helps to temper the initial extreme saltiness and balance the flavor as you chew the meat of the fruit. 

One of my new obsessions is getting a bag of kakimochi pre-mixed with li hing powder from Aloha Gourmet Products (sold in stores like Longs, as well as online), crushing it coarsely, and sprinkling it on poke — any kind of poke. It sounds odd, but it works. The subtle crunch of kakimochi adds texture to the fish, as well as an infusion of comforting flavors from my childhood. 

Prepackaged seeds can be found at grocery and drugstores all throughout Hawaii. For a true crack seed store experience though, go to a store that scoops your order straight out of the jar. [ eHI ]